Trust God and Be Saved-Jeremiah 34-39

on . . Hits: 158

Big Idea: Destroy God's Word, God destroys you. Trust God and be saved.

"I will save you; you will not fall by the sword but will escape with your life, because you trust in me, declares the Lord” (Jer 39:18).

Trusting God--which requires faith--is the way to life (Gen 15:6; Rom 1:17). Trusting God is a central theme of Scripture (Prov 3:5; Jn 14:1). Since preaching through 66 chapters of Isaiah for two years, I found that it is Isaiah's singular message -- Trust God -- as follows:

  • Ch. 1-39 (Assyrian invasion): Trust God instead of your own scheming.
  • Ch. 40-55 (Babylonian exile): Trust God to deliver you while in exile.
  • Ch. 56-66 (Return from exile): Trust God to enable/empower you to start over from scratch with a new life.

When Abraham trusted God, he became a blessing to the world (Gen 12:3). But when Lot trusted himself, he ended up a fearful lonely drunken man.

When Joseph trusted God, he thrived as a slave and even as a foreigner in prison (Gen 39:2). But when his brothers trusted themselves, they lived in the darkness for over two decades ... until their brother saved them (Gen 50:20).

When David trusted God, he experienced God's deliverance througout his life (Psalm 23). But when Saul trusted himself, he was defeated and his sons were killed by the enemy Philistines, while he committed suicide.

When Jesus' disciples trusted God, they blessed the whole world. But when Judas trusted his smartness and 30 pieces of silver, his life epitomizes tragedy upon tragedy.

Without a doubt, all of Scripture encourages God's people to trust God and be still and see the deliverance of the Lord!

Creating a New Heart (ch. 30-31); One Heart and One Way (ch.32-33). The heart and center of Jeremiah is ch. 30-33. The central theme and subject is the new covenant (31:31-34). The primary focus is the exiles return from Babylon. It is called the "Book of Consolation." It is better called the "Book of Restoration," for it picks up the negative judgment imagery of Jeremiah 1-29 (destroyed city, diminished population, exile, sickness, end of joy, broken covenant, Israel like a harlot, foreign domination, etc) and reverses it into imagery of restoration (rebuilt city, increased population, regathering, healing, etc.). From ch. 34 onwards, the perspective returns to the time of the seige, beginning with another word of Jeremiah to Zedekiah, which is unchanged in essentials (Jer 21:3-7; 32:3-5), leading to the fall of Jerusalem in ch. 39.

“Whenever Jehudi had read three or four columns of the scroll, the king cut them off with a scribe’s knife and threw them into the firepot, until the entire scroll was burned in the fire. 24 The king and all his attendants who heard all these words showed no fear, nor did they tear their clothes” (Jer 36:23-24). I will save you; you will not fall by the sword but will escape with your life, because you trust in me, declares the Lord” (Jer 39:18).

Outline of Jeremiah:

1: The Call of Jeremiah.

2-29: Judgment (Prediction).

30-33: Salvation (Comfort, Consolation).

34-52: Judgment (Actual).

Destroy God's Word, God Destroys You (Jeremiah 34-39a); Trust God and be Saved (Jeremiah 39b)

Ch. 34: Faithlessness (God’s people)

Ch. 35: Faithfulness (The Rekabites)

Ch. 36: Destroy the message (Burn God’s word)

Ch. 37-38: Destroy the messenger (Imprison Jeremiah and kill him)

Ch. 39: Destroyers destroyed but the faithful are saved (I will rescue you, I will save you because you trust in me)

34: God is faithful to his promises, and he expects his people to be faithful to their promises.

35: If family traditions can be maintained, then faithfulnes to God should be maintained.

36: The powerful word of God cannot be destroyed or stymied.

37: Persecution cannot stop the power and authority of God's word.

38: In times of hostility and negative public opinion, faithfulness to God requires courage.

39: Those who trust in God find deliverance, while those who defy and rebel against God experience judgment.

Questions:

 

  1. [ch. 34: God is faithful to his promises, and he expects his people to be faithful to their promises.] What was God’s word to Zedekiah through Jeremiah (2ff, 21)? What did Zedekiah proclaim and then renege (8-11)? Why (37:5)? What would God do (17-20; Gen 15:17)?
  2. [ch. 35:  If family traditions can be maintained, then faithfulnes to God can be maintained.] What did the Rekabites refuse and why (5-10)? How are they different from the Israelites (14-16)? How would God respond (17-19)?
  3. [ch. 36:  The powerful word of God cannot be destroyed or stymied.] Why write God’s word on a scroll (5)? What did Baruch do (1-6)? How many times was it read (8-10, 15, 23)? How did the people (16) and the king and his attendants respond (23-24)? What would God do (28-31, 32)?
  4. [ch. 37: Persecution cannot stop the power and authority of God's word.] Why do you think Jeremiah was falsely charged, arrested and badly beaten up (11-13, 14-16)?
  5. [ch. 38: In times of hostility and negative public opinion, faithfulness to God requires courage.] With what charge did the officials want to kill Jeremiah (2-4)? What did they do (6)? What did Ebed-Melek, a Cushite do (7-13)?
  6. [ch. 39 (Jer 52; 2 Ki 25; 2 Chron 36): Those who trust in God find deliverance, while those who defy and rebel against God experience judgment. {All that Jeremiah prophesied in ch.1-29 now happen (8-10).}]  Contrast the fate of Zedekiah (4-7) with that of Jeremiah (11-14) and Ebed-Melek (16-17).

 

 

Share this post

Submit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Add comment


Security code
Refresh